Harmony

Harmony, California, Andrea Chilcote

What if you could go on vacation in your mind, even just for a moment? And what if that resulted in a more harmonious day? I just tried it, and I hope you will too, after you read the post I wrote on vacation last summer.

by Andrea Chilcote

I’m on vacation this week, a vacation that I anticipated and now savor. I am graced by rest, beauty and pleasant activities.

When my pace slows enough, I’m able to hold a perspective which seems inaccessible on the usual busy days of life. Oh, even on vacation I feel moments of stress, due to anything from a minor work request to misplacing the rental car keys. But the difference is that on vacation, I almost always observe it and decide if it’s worth the emotional energy. Even when it is, there are energetic bookends of peace that keep stress in its proper place.

There’s a very small town near where we are in California, called Harmony. We’ve visited there three times this week, as it’s the home of one of our favorite wineries. We picnic on their lawns with our dogs, enjoying cool breezes, gorgeous scenery and the scent of lavender growing in the gardens. (And yes, good wine, of course). Early this week, I decided that “harmony” was my intended state of being.

As I began to write this post, I assessed my performance in that harmonious state. At first, I felt a touch of self-judgment, as I knew I have not been what I previously defined as “harmonious,” 24-7.

Then I googled the word. Amazingly, harmony results from the balance between tense and relaxed moments. You musicians know this of course. But for me, and for the rest of you, this information is powerful. Harmony exists when there is wholeness and acceptance of the human experience.

There’s no doubt that I will again lose my car keys, as well as experience many other so-called stressful moments. My intention is to bring harmony home with me and weather them to the sound of beautiful music. How about you?

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This post appeared originally on The Spirited Woman where Andrea is a weekly blogger. Enjoy it!

It’s All Small Stuff

Don't Sweat the Small Stuff

Have you found yourself hijacked by a moment? Reflecting back to October 2012, Andrea shares one of the many opportunities she has had to practice patience with herself – another reminder for us all to practice self-care.

by Andrea Chilcote

This week I have had ample opportunities to practice patience with myself. If you are someone who, like me, expects much of yourself on a daily basis, you might relate to the way I felt in the midst of my predicament on Monday night.

Upon arriving in Jacksonville, Florida at 10 pm, I proceeded to the rental car counter. As I have done thousands of times before, I opened my wallet to produce my driver’s license. It was not there.

Unable to believe it was lost, I began to frantically search my various bags – purse, briefcase, the pockets of my suitcase – even though I would not have put it there. The kind agent suggested that I must have used it to get through security. I replied that I always use my passport for security, so as not to ever remove my license from my wallet, risking its loss.

Eventually I excused myself from the counter to search privately, to no avail. I sat, forcing myself to breathe and think. Upon doing so I recalled that I had put the license in the zippered pocket of my hiking pants before leaving on a remote back-country hike. Presumably it was still in Arizona, provided it had not been destroyed by the washer and dryer cycles it had endured.

I made my way back to the car rental counter where I canceled my car and asked for directions to the taxi stand. My hotel was 30 minutes away and my client’s office another 30, so I was facing some hefty taxi fares over the next two days.

Once in the cab, I immediately texted my husband Arthur and asked him to find my license. It was one thing to manage without it for two days, and quite another to face the lines at the DMV to get a new one. After some grousing (he claimed there were no hiking pants with zippered pockets to be found), he located it.

Five minutes into the ride, I realized I was shaking. That sensation “shook” me awake. I realized that, while inconvenient, this was a simple mistake. No one was harmed, and no consequences would come of it, except a large taxi bill. And while I considered the bill, I also considered the fact that my very appreciative and considerate client might even offer to drive me to and from the office – that is, if I told him the story. Hmmmm. It would take a lot for me to admit this personal failing.

In his classic book, Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff (and It’s All Small Stuff), Richard Carlson says that when we overreact and blow things out of proportion, we literally immobilize ourselves, rendering our problem-solving ability handicapped, and diminishing our results. That principle played out during my taxi ride.

By the time I reached my hotel, I had calmed myself to the point of perspective. This so-called problem was very, very small in the big scheme of life. I decided I would take a cab to the office in the morning and tell my client. (I practiced first with the hotel’s bellman who arranged for the morning cab, and he just smiled and seemed to not think less of me for having forgotten my driver’s license). As it turned out, my client lived near my hotel, was happy to shuttle me, and it gave us additional time for working conversations.

I don’t know if leaving your driver’s license behind would cause you to experience stress and self-judgment. I do believe that many of you – us – allow those kinds of thoughts and feelings to hijack otherwise peaceful and productive states of being. Your triggers and mine may be different, but unless you’re one of those people in the post office line, you know what I’m talking about. What I learned this week is that the experience of stress and impatience with my shortcomings is a choice, and choosing to transform it leads to better results. Try it if you dare.

You will never be completely free from life’s little annoyances,                                    but you can become free from feeling annoyed.                                               —Richard Carlson

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This post appeared originally on The Spirited Woman where Andrea is a weekly blogger.